• Toledo, Ohio

ReInvest Toledo formed in 2015 as a partnership with the Lucas County Land Bank and the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC).

Uniting Communities and Organizations

You know best what your neighborhood needs — but, maybe you need access to financial and social resources in order to create a truly lasting solution. Reinvest Toledo is a community coalition designed to connect neighborhood leaders like you to area stakeholders (like banks, non-profits, government officials, developers, and key institutions) who have similar interests and available resources waiting to be put to use.

Dr. Brittany Jones, Chair of the Food Oasis Alliance of Toledo and Charlotte Lawson, Founder of One Neighborhood at a Time meet with City of Toledo Department of Neighborhoods Director, Rosalind Clemons.
Reinvest Toledo partners with these and other community organizations to make a greater impact for Toledo’s LMI communities.

Creating Lasting Impact in Toledo

You want to make a difference in Toledo. You’re looking for a smart, trusted way to put your organization’s resources into action. Where do you start? Reinvest Toledo is a dynamic community coalition designed to connect you and your organization to neighborhood leaders in Toledo. Together, we create a shared agenda that aligns existing needs with available financial and social capital. It’s the visibility your organization wants and the collaborative thinking Toledo needs.

Coming Together For A Common Cause

Too often, Toledo’s neighborhood efforts occur in silos. Reinvest Toledo exists as a dynamic community connector designed to leverage available financial and social capital across Toledo. We bring together neighborhoods, non-profits, government officials, developers, and anchor and financial institutions to identify shared interests and opportunities. This collaborative approach is critical to creating sustainable partnerships and outcomes.
RT is training various Englewood leaders to access the 2023 NRSA funds available for community revitalization.

Coalition Members

RT works with identified community leaders from many of Toledo’s low and moderate-income communities. Our members are dedicated to attending advocacy training, participating in local politics, and lifting their voices on national initiatives. The following neighborhoods have representatives who are actively involved with Reinvest Toledo:

Community Advocacy Training Series

The Toledo Community Foundation provided funds to support this year-long series, designed to train, educate and empower community leaders. These training opportunities were held in various community locations and brought city and county officials, community organizations and neighborhood leaders together for dialog around three key subjects: Food security, Housing and Law and Policy.

Click each image to see more information about the training.

CAT 1

Featuring Malcolm Cunningham, Master Urban Farmer, as the workshop moderator, this event featured a panel of three solution-oriented food system advocates that created positive change in academia, policy, farming, and food access in Toledo. Panelists discussed their journeys, what they learned along the way, and how they thought through creating positive, lasting change in their communities.

Creating positive change can only happen by understanding a problem and who the people, groups, and decision-makers are that influence the situation. By the end of the workshop activity, participants had additional tools that helped them understand, assess, and plan to address problems in their communities. This workshop focused on food access–the challenges in neighborhoods, what potential solutions exist, and how might we analyze power and concentrate organizing energy to create positive change.

CAT 2

Through engaging presentations, insightful discussions, and community dialogue, we explorde the impact of redlining, its consequences, and steps toward promoting equity and justice.

Highlights of the Program:

Historical Overview: Participants learned about the origins and practices of redlining, a discriminatory practice that systematically segregated neighborhoods based on race and socio-economic factors.

Expert Speakers: Opportunity to engage with renowned experts in urban planning, community development, and historical research. Who shared their knowledge and expertise on redlining, providing valuable insights into its impact on neighborhoods and communities.

Personal Stories: The audience heard personal stories from community members who experienced the effects of redlining firsthand. They gained a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by individuals and families affected by discriminatory housing practices.

Interactive Discussions: There were thought-provoking discussions on the consequences of redlining and its relevance in contemporary society. Participants explored the implications for housing, education, economic opportunities, and community well-being.

Strategies for Change: Participants learned strategies and initiatives aimed at addressing the legacy of redlining in the Ironwood community. They engaged in conversations about community-driven solutions, advocacy efforts, and policies that promote equitable access to housing and resources.

Networking Opportunities: RT connected with fellow community members, local organizations, and activists committed to promoting social justice and equity in the Ironwood community. Attendees were able to expand their network and collaborate on future initiatives.

Creating positive change can only happen by understanding a problem and who the people, groups, and decision-makers are that influence the situation. By the end of the workshop activity, participants had additional tools that helped them understand, assess, and plan to address problems in their communities. This workshop focused on food access–the challenges in neighborhoods, what potential solutions exist, and how might we analyze power and concentrate organizing energy to create positive change.

CAT 3

In the final CAT we explored the problems, the policies, and the plans for addressing violence and food insecurity in low to moderate-income neighborhoods in Toledo. Participants heard from subject matter experts and community members driving this work!